​​​​GALWAY PREMIER CHAMPIONS 2017 

                    CONNACHT CUP WINNERS 2016

ATHENRY FOOTBALL CLUB est 1971


ATHENRY FOOTBALL CLUB CODE OF CONDUCT  
Incorporating the Football Association of Ireland, Connacht Football Association and Galway Football Association 

General
Soccer is an international game. All those involved with the game at every level and whether as an administrator, coach, player or parent, have a responsibility, above and beyond compliance with the law, to act according to the highest standards of integrity, and to ensure that the reputation of the game is, and remains, high. This code applies to all those involved in soccer under the auspices of the Football Association of Ireland.
 
Community 
Soccer, at all levels, is a vital part of the community. Soccer will take into account community feeling when making decisions. 

Equality 
Soccer is opposed to discrimination of any form and will promote measures to prevent it, in whatever form, from being expressed. 

Participants 
Soccer recognizes the sense of ownership felt by those who participate at all levels of the game. This includes those who play, coach or help out in any way, and those who officiate, as well as administrators and supporters. Soccer is committed to appropriate consultation. 

Propriety
Soccer acknowledges that public confidence demands the highest standards of financial and administrative behavior within the game, and will not tolerate corruption or improper practices. 

Trust and Respect 
Soccer will uphold a relationship of trust and respect between all involved in the game, whether they are individuals, clubs or other organizations.

Violence 
Soccer rejects the use of violence of any nature by anyone involved in the game. 

Integrity and Fair Play 
Soccer is committed to the principle of playing to win consistent with fair play.

Football and Young People
Soccer acknowledges the extent of its influence over young people and pledges to set a positive example. The Football Association of Ireland and Athenry Soccer Club are indebted to the countless number of volunteers who give of their time in providing football opportunities for children and young people. Like all sports, football, provides an excellent pathway for children and young people to learn new skills, become more confident and maximize their own potential. Through their participation, they can learn and develop life skills, have fun and enjoyment, make friends and experience life in a way that can enhance their personal growth throughout their lives. People become involved in football for young people for a variety of different reasons.  

They come from a variety of sporting backgrounds and take on various roles within clubs and other football organizations. Yet irrespective of their role or responsibility, they all share the common goal of providing football opportunities for young people. Coaches, parents and administrators all have an important role to play in promoting good practice in children’s sport. They should have, as their first priority, children’s safety and enjoyment of the sport. The FAI wants sport to be safe, to be fun and to ensure that no matter what sport young people are involved in, that it takes place in the spirit of ‘FAIR PLAY’. 

Fair play is the guiding principle of the Irish Sport’s Council’s Code of Ethics as well as the FAI’s Code of Ethics and Good Practice which is designed to provide guidance for those working with young people in football. It outlines the type of issues that need to be discussed and addressed to provide the safest and most enjoyable environment not only for players but also the coaches and volunteers involved. Coaches achieve satisfaction from working with children and young people. Focusing on the individual participants’ needs and performance encourages young people to achieve and demonstrate enjoyment, equality and fair play. They will come to realize that standards of behavior are as important as sports performance. In taking this approach children are encouraged to:

Do their best – put in their best effort.

Improve and develop their skills.

Make friends.

Play by the rules.

Appreciate/accept everyone in the group, regardless of ability, race, religion, gender etc. 


Football for Fun
Soccer at Athenry Football Club is meant to be fun. We will try to challenge your child to reach out of his “comfort zone” and improve himself as a Player and a person. We will attempt to do this in environments that are fun, yet challenging. Soccer is a fun game and meant to be enjoyed by all participants young and old. In promoting “Football for Fun” everyone involved in the Athenry Soccer Club should:

Encourage participation and fun.

Promote the development of skills as opposed to winning at all costs.

Emphasize and praise effort.

Act as a good role model.

Insist on Fair Play.

Be realistic with expectations.

Be aware of children’s feelings.

Teach players to respect different cultures. 


Athenry Football club is committed to all of the above principles. We set out below a code of conduct for all our managers, coaches, players and parents which also incorporate the Football Association ofIreland Code of Ethics & Good Practice for Children’s Soccer. Athenry Football club must abide by the standards, codes and practices set out by the Football Association of Ireland, Connacht Football Association and Galway Football Association. The Football Association of Ireland Code of Ethics & Good Practice for Children’s Soccer can be located on the F.A.I. website at www.fai.ie .

Coaches and Managers
Coaches and Managers are the key to the establishment of ethics in football. Their concept of ethics and their attitude directly affects the behavior of players under their supervision. Coaches are, therefore, expected to pay particular care to the moral aspect of their conduct.  Coaches have to be aware that almost all of their everyday decisions and choices of actions, as well as strategic targets, have ethical implications. It is natural that winning constitutes a basic concern for coaches. This code is not intended to conflict with that. However, the code calls for coaches to disassociate themselves from a 'win-at-all-costs' attitude. Increased responsibility is requested from coaches involved in coaching young people. The health, safety, welfare and moral education of young people are a first priority, before the achievement or the reputation of the organization, club, school, coach or parent. Set out below is our own code of Code of Conduct (which reflects the standards expressed by the Football Association of Ireland) which forms the benchmark for all involved in coaching and managing in Athenry Soccer club.  

Relationships
The good coach will be concerned primarily with the well-being, health and future of the individual player and only secondarily with the optimizing of performance. A key element in a coach/player relationship is the development of independence of the player. Players must be encouraged to accept responsibility for their own behavior and performance in training, competition, and in their social life. The relationship between coach/player relies heavily on mutual trust and respect. In detail this means that the player should be aware of the coaches’ qualifications and experience and must be given the opportunity to consent to or decline proposals for training and performance. 

Coaches must not encourage players to violate the laws of the game and should actively seek to discourage such action. Furthermore, coaches should encourage players to obey the spirit of such laws. Coaches must not compromise their players by advocating measures which could be deemed to constitute seeking to gain an unfair advantage (cheating, diving, bullying). Above all, coaches must never advocate the use of proscribed drugs or other banned performance enhancing substances. Coaches must treat opponents and officials with due respect both in victory and defeat and should encourage their players to act in a similar manner. Coaches must accept responsibility for the conduct of their players insofar as they will undertake to discourage inappropriate behavior.  

Lead by Example and Demand Best Practice Standards 

Personal Standards
Coaches are given a position of trust by parents/guardians and players, and are therefore expected to show the highest standards of behavior whilst in the company of under age players. As a coach of under age players, you act in “loco parentis” and therefore your duty of care is more onerous than that of a coach to an adult team. The coach must consistently display high personal standards and project a favorable image of the game and of coaching - to other players, coaches, officials, spectators, the media and the general public. Personal appearance is a matter of individual taste but the coach has an obligation to project an image of health, cleanliness and functional efficiency. 

Coaches should not drink alcohol so soon before coaching that their judgment may be impaired and the smell of alcohol will still be on their breath when working with players.

Whilst players are present, consumption of alcohol should be avoided. When the event is a social one, with players present, consumption should be moderate. As persons responsible for the well-being of young people, it is inappropriate to smoke in their presence or to behave in any fashion inconsistent with your position of responsibility. Coaches/volunteers must respect the rights, dignity and worth of every human being and their ultimate right to self-determination. Specifically, coaches/volunteers must treat everyone equally within the context of their activity, regardless of sex, ethnic origin, religion or political persuasion. 

Safe Practice
Coaches have a responsibility to ensure the safety of the players with whom they work as far as possible within the limits of their control. Therefore coaches should seek to create a safe and enjoyable environment in which to play and train. Injuries should be recorded, with a note of action taken in relation to each one. It is recommended by the F.A.I. that each club maintain an accident/incident book with a specific report form to be completed by the coach/manager. A first aid kit should be available at all training sessions and matches. Parents/guardians should be notified of injuries/illness which their children incur while participating in a sporting activity. It would also be advisable for coaches to inform parents if their child becomes upset for whatever reason. The reason why the child became upset may then be clarified. It could be that a child has miss interpreted something that has been said or it could be an indication of bullying. Parents/guardians should be informed of the starting and finishing times of training sessions and matches. 

Besides necessary manipulation of limbs in teaching technique, physical contact is not appropriate. In the sporting context certain types of coaching requires a “hands on approach” i.e. it may be necessary to support a child in order to physically demonstrate a technique. This should only occur when necessary and in an open and appropriate way with the knowledge, permission and full understanding of the child concerned and where appropriate the parents/guardians. Coaches should not treat injuries out of sight of others. Use a "Two-Deep" (two personnel, or two players) supervision system. Only personnel who are qualified in administering First Aid or treating sports injuries should attempt to treat an injury. The comfort level and dignity of the player should always be the priority.

Example: Only uncover the injured area, or cover private areas of the athlete's body.

Generally, physical contact between players or coach and players should not involve touching genital area, buttocks, breasts, or mouths and should only occur when others are present. (“Two Deep” supervision). Any doubts of a medical nature should be passed on to a suitably qualified medical person. Coaches should not play injured players. 

Comforting/congratulating players is an important part of the relationship between coaches and players. Guidelines for this type of touch are as follows: 

Limit touching to "safe" areas, such as hand-to-shoulder. It should not involve touching genital area, buttocks, breasts, or mouths.

Make your intention to congratulate or comfort clear to the player.

Get permission from the player before embracing them - remember that personnel are in the position of power.

Respect a players discomfort or rejection of physical contact.

Be sure that touching occurs only when others are present.

Best Practice

Coaches are responsible for setting and monitoring the boundaries between a working relationship and friendship with their players. This is particularly important when the coach and players are of opposite sex and/or when the player is a young person. Young players need a coach whom they can respect; therefore it is important that coaches should lead by example. Young players play for fun and enjoyment therefore skill development and playing for fun take precedence over highly structured competition. Winning is not the only objective. Coaches should set realistic goals for both the team and individual players and should not push young players into inappropriate or over competitive adult like competitions. In relation to young players, coaches should ensure that all players participate and “average” players require and deserve equal time and attention. Do not over-burden younger players with too much information. 

In keeping children and young people at the forefront of planning and practice, coaches can be confident that participants will enjoy their football experiences and that their actions are regarded as safe and in keeping with the principle that the welfare of children is of paramount consideration. Coaches are given a position of trust by parents/guardians and players, and should show the highest standards of behavior whilst in the company of under age players. It is important that coaches follow an agreed code of good practice and parents/club officials are satisfied that coaches are suitable to lead the activities undertaken. The comprehensive Code of Ethics & Best Practice guidelines are available on the F.A.I website at www.fai.ie. It is important to note that in adhering to these guidelines we ensure not only a safe environment for children but also a safe environment in which coaches and volunteers can operate. 

Coaches should help and encourage young players to develop basic skills and sportsmanship and they should avoid over-specialization in positional play during their formative years. Coaches should ensure that all players are aware that “bullying” whether verbal or physical will not be tolerated. Coaches should advise players and parents on how and whom to go to if they wish to make a complaint. All clubs should have a systematic complaints procedure. A coach must not attempt to exert undue influence over the player’s performance in order to obtain personal benefit or reward. 

The coach must realize that certain situations or friendly actions could be misinterpreted, not only by the player, but by outsiders motivated by jealousy, dislike or mistrust and could lead to allegations of sexual misconduct or impropriety. Therefore coaches should be aware of, and avoid all situations conducive to risk. The coach will on occasion be required to travel and reside with players in the course of coaching and competitive matches. On such occasions, ensure separate sleeping accommodation for officials and players. Most coaches work in an environment where it is recognized that, in a sporting context, certain types of coaching require a ‘hands on approach’, i.e., it may be necessary to support a participant in order to physically demonstrate a particular technique. This should only occur when necessary and in an open and appropriate way with the knowledge, permission and full understanding of the participant concerned and his/her parents/guardians. Coaches must realize that certain situations or friendly actions could be misinterpreted, not only by the player, but by outsiders motivated by jealousy, dislike or mistrust and could lead to allegations of sexual misconduct or impropriety. Therefore coaches should be aware of, and avoid all situations conducive to risk.

Coaches who use their own vehicles to transport players must ensure that they have adequate insurance cover and be careful not to carry more than the permitted number of passengers. Coaches should be careful not to expose children especially younger participants to extreme weather conditions. Decisions in this regard should be made from the child’s perspective. Where the team is composed of both genders, there should be a male and female official present. The coach should never be in a room or similar alone with a player. Where this is unavoidable, leave the door open and be within earshot of others (“Two Deep” supervision).

Officials should avoid situations where they are alone with young players in changing rooms. Wherever practicable, there should always be two or more adults in changing rooms. Physical relationships with under-age players are illegal.  

Children are defined in Irish law as any person under the age of 18 years.
The use of drugs, alcohol and tobacco should be actively discouraged as being incompatible with a healthy approach to the playing of the game. Coaches should strive to eliminate all unfair practices, including the use of drugs which effect performance. The Football Association of Ireland has amended its rules to include a child protection element in line with recent child welfare legislation and Government Guidelines. Specifically coaches/volunteers are required to operate within these recommended codes of conduct and best practice. Breaches of this code may constitute a disciplinary offence. 

Where possible, coaches should avoid:

Spending excessive amounts of time with children away from others

Taking sessions alone (always employ “Two Deep” supervision)

Taking children to their homes

Taking children on journeys alone in their car 

Coaches should not

Use any form of corporal punishment or physical force on a child

Exert undue influence over a participant in order to obtain personal benefit or reward

Engage in rough physical games, sexually provocative games or allow or engage in inappropriate touching of any kind.

Make sexually suggestive comments about, or to a child.

Take measurements or engage in certain types of fitness testing without the presence of another adult. (“Two Deep” supervision)

Undertake any form of therapy (hypnosis etc.) in the training of children.

Ridicule or shout at a child for making a mistake or losing a game

Put undue pressure on a child to please or perform well

Share a room with a young person alone on away trips. 

Player Centered Approach

Coaches need to be aware of why children want to play soccer. They want to learn new skills, make new friends, be part of a group, to win and be successful, experience challenges, excitement and action. While winning is important, it must be remembered that winning at all costs does not meet the needs of players. Results are not necessarily a good indicator of coaching effectiveness or ability, the improvement level of players and their level of enjoyment is. Coaches should aim to provide a safe and enjoyable environment where children and young people are placed at the centre of all activities.

In promoting good practice and creating a child/player centered approach coaches should:

In acting as good role models coaches should:

Encourage and be positive during sessions so that players leave with a sense of achievement.

Set challenging, realistic but achievable goals.

Plan and prepare each session appropriately and ensure proper levels of supervision.

Ensure that all activities are inclusive and allow all players to participate in an enjoyable way.

Put the welfare and enjoyment of players first and strike a balance between this and winning or achieving results.

Enforce the principles of fair play treating each player equally, with dignity and respect and ensure that all players play within the rules.

Be aware of the developmental stages and needs of players.

Avoid over training and over emphasis on competition.

Involve parents/guardians and other club members in what we do.

Be qualified and up to date with the latest coaching knowledge and skills. 

In promoting “Sport for Fun” coaches should:

Encourage participation and fun.

Promote the development of skills as opposed to winning at all costs.

Emphasize and praise effort.

Act as a good role model.

Actively discourage children/young players from abusing referees, officials, team mates or opponents (take off offending players).

Insist on FAIR PLAY (take off offending players).

Be realistic with your expectations.

Be aware of children’s feelings.

Teach players to respect different cultures. 

Safety
Coaches have a responsibility to ensure the safety of the players with whom they work as far as possible within the limits of their control. Therefore, coaches should seek to create a safe and enjoyable environment in which to play and train. In this respect:

Regular safety checks should be carried out in relation to premises, training facilities and equipment.

Appropriate safety rules should be adopted and implemented.

Parents/guardians should be informed of the starting and finishing times of training sessions and matches.

A first aid kit should be available at all training sessions /matches and injuries should be recorded, with a note of action taken in relation to each one. Never play injured players.

Parents/Guardians should be notified of injuries/illness which their children incur while participating in any football activity a positive approach to the involvement of children in sport.

A Player must be in the under 17 age group and over to train or play at senior level i.e. he must be over the 16 age group.

No under age player can play more than one year above his age group i.e. an under 10 can’t play under 12 or under 14 can only play under 14 and 15. 


Athenry Football Club has noted that FAI Ireland has amended its rules to include a child protection element in line with Children First (Department of Health & Children), the Irish Sports Council’s Code of Ethics & Good Practice and relevant recent child welfare legislation. Specifically coaches/volunteers are required to operate within these recommended codes of conduct and best practice. The complete code of conduct for coaches is posted at 

www.fai.ie

. “Sport for young people is about Fun and Participation Best effort and Fair Play in a safe environment” 

All Coaches and Managers in Athenry Football Club are fully aware of the need to follow the guidelines laid down in this code. They must abide by all the rules and guidelines set out in this document.

Coaches must respect the rights, dignity and worth of each and every person and treat each equally within the context of the sport.

Coaches must place the well-being and safety of each player above all other considerations, including the development of performance.

Coaches must adhere to all guidelines laid down by governing bodies.

Coaches can not play a player who is not registered under the Galway Football Association.

Coaches can not play a non member of Athenry Soccer Club.

Coaches must develop an appropriate working relationship with each player based on mutual trust and respect.

Coaches must not exert undue influence to obtain personal benefit or reward.

Coaches must encourage and guide players to accept responsibility for their own behavior and performance.

Coaches must ensure that the activities they direct or advocate are appropriate for the age, maturity, experience and ability of the players.

Coaches should, at the outset, clarify with the players (and, where appropriate, parent(s)\Guardians) exactly what is expected of them and also what they are entitled to expect from their coach.

Coaches must co-operate fully with other specialists (e.g. other coaches, officials, sports scientists, doctors, physiotherapists) in the best interests of the player.

Coaches must always promote the positive aspects of the sport (e.g. Fair Play) and never condone violations of the Laws of the Game, behavior contrary to the spirit of the Laws of the Game or relevant rules and regulations or the use of prohibited substances or techniques.

Coaches must consistently display high standards of behavior appearance.

Coaches must not use or tolerate inappropriate language.

Coaches where possible should not coach or manage any juvenile (under age) team on his/her own. He or she should always be accompanied by another adult (person who is over 18 years of age i.e. a person who is ineligible to play at any under age group through his or her date of birth).

Any abuse of the above code by a coach, manager or player must be reported to the Athenry Soccer club committee immediately and to the club child Safety Officer where appropriate.

Coaches and managers may be suspended or expelled from the club for abuse of the above code following a decision by the committee.

It is the Manager or Coaches obligation to pay all fines imposed on them by the Football Association of Ireland, Connacht Football Association, Galway Football Association and Athenry Soccer club on request so as to avoid further suspension.

Players 
We expect all players involved with Athenry Football Club to follow the guidelines set out below and all parents must ensure their child understands our Players Code of Conduct.

To up-hold the name of Athenry Football Club at all times.

To play by the laws of the game and to up-hold the rules of Football Association of Ireland, Connacht FA, Galway FA and Athenry Football club at all times.

Play for enjoyment, not just to please your parents or coach. Remember that the goals of the game are to have fun, improve your skills, and feel good.

To try your best in training sessions & in matches.

Play with control. Do not loose your temper.

Play for yourself and your team - your team’s performance will benefit and so will your own.

Do not attempt to cheat by diving or feigning injury in an attempt to con the referee

To listen and show respect to the Team Manager & coaches at all times

To respect their fellow team mates. 

To respect all opponents irrespective of the result of a game.

Tackle hard but fairly, do not intend to hurt your opponent

Treat all players as you would like to be treated. Give opponents a hand if they are injured, put the ball out of play so they can receive attention. Give the ball back to your opponents if they have put the ball out of play when one of your team mates needs attention. Always remember that you owe a duty of care to your opponents.

To demonstrate Fair Play & Sportsmanship and be a “good sport”. Applaud all good play whether by your team or the opponent.

To accept, respect and never argue refereeing decisions or any made by all other match officials and to co-operate with referees, coaches, team mates and opponents.

To demonstrate appropriate behavior during coaching sessions and matches.

To accept success & failure & victory & defeat equally. Win with humility - loose with dignity. Nobody likes a sore loser.

At the final whistle applaud and thank your opponents and the referee for the match.

Do not “bully” or take advantage of any player. Do not accept “bullying” in your club.

It is most important that you don’t keep secrets. Tell your Club Children’s Officer, your parents, anyone you trust, if some one is causing you harm or distress. You have a right to be safe

To abide by any suspension imposed by the Football Association of Ireland, Connacht FA, Galway FA and Athenry Soccer club.

It is the Player’s obligation to pay all fines imposed on them by the Football Association of Ireland, Connacht FA, Galway FA and Athenry Soccer club on request so as to avoid further suspension.

Above all to enjoy their football & be proud of being a member of Athenry Soccer Club!!

Any abuse of the above code or any inappropriate behavior by players, managers, coaches or players must be immediately reported to the committee.

Players may be suspended or expelled from the club for abuse of the above code following a decision by the committee.

Guide for Parents / Guardians
Parents / guardians play an important role in promoting children’s happiness and success in football and sport in general. Parental expectations and behavior have significant bearing on children’s attitude and behavior while participating in football. Parents / guardians need to be aware of why children want to play football. Children want to learn new skills, make new friends, be part of a group, to win and be successful, experience challenges, excitement and action. While winning is important, it must be remembered that winning at all costs does not meet the needs of players. Results are not necessarily a good indicator of coaching effectiveness or ability, the improvement level of players and their level of enjoyment is. Support and encouragement from parents / guardians will contribute to children having: Parents have a great influence on children’s enjoyment and success in football. All children play football because they first and foremost love the game - its fun.  

It is important to remember that however good a child may become at football within Athenry Soccer Club it is important that we reinforce the message to parents that positive encouragement will contribute to:

Children enjoying soccer.

A sense of personal achievement.

Improving the child's skills and techniques.

Improved physical fitness.

Higher self-esteem.

Improved social skills. 


It is important for parents / guardians to find out what their children want from football, and help them to set realistic targets to achieve this. This may involve controlling their own aspirations and avoiding the desire to force their own dreams or unfulfilled ambitions on them. It is important to:

Encourage but not force children to be active.

Know when he / she are ready to play.

Encourage healthy lifestyle habits.

Attend training and games where possible.

Promote and teach FAIR PLAY.

Teach your child to treat referees, other players, coaches, officials and spectators with respect regardless of race, creed, color, sex or ability.

Help children to set realistic targets.

Help children with decision making.

Parents / Guardians should never:

Insult players or club personnel.

Argue with, or shout abuse at officials and they should actively discourage children or young players from doing likewise.

Suggest or encourage cheating, aggressive or "dirty" play.

Placing undue or inappropriate criticism on a player, causing the player unnecessary or unhealthy levels of stress.

Behave with physical or verbal aggression towards another person (actually use force or threaten the use of force).

Engage in any "harassment" type of behavior.

Ignore or dismiss complaints or concerns expressed by a child which relate to his/her involvement in soccer.

Ridicule or shout at a child for losing a game or making a mistake.

Treat any club as a child minding service.

Take safety for granted.

Put undue pressure on any child to please or perform well. 

Most importantly parents / guardians should: “LEAD BY EXAMPLE”

A parent’s expectations and attitudes have a significant bearing on a child's attitude towards:

Other players.

Officials.

Managers and Coaches.

Spectators.  


Parent / Coach Co-Operation
It is important that parents / guardians establish contact with the individual responsible for coaching their child. In addition, parents / guardians should:

Give the coach help when asked and show appreciation for a job well done.

Support the coach’s and referee decisions. These individuals are only doing the best they can and they need support not anger.

Refrain from contacting the coach unless it is necessary, respect they have a private life.

Inform the coach about any illness, injury, holidays, etc.

Make an effort to attend training and games.

Communicate any concerns you may have to the coach.

Make sure the child has appropriate equipment/clothing/refreshments.

Encourage FAIR PLAY at home and do not instill a “win at all costs” attitude in children.

Be positive or be quiet, negative comments are counter productive.

Conduct themselves in such a way which promotes the definition of FAIR PLAY.

Be prepared to be asked to leave by officials or club personnel if behavior is contrary to the definition of FAIR PLAY. 

At Athenry Football Club we want to ensure that the parents of our children are always positive and encouraging towards all children and not just their own. We therefore encourage you to:

Applaud all children as well as your own.

Avoid coaching your child during training or games.

Not to shout and scream.

Respect the coach and other officials.

Give attention to each of the children involved in our organization, not just the most talented.

Give encouragement to every child who participates in activities organized by Athenry Soccer Club.

Not to criticize your child on any part of the Player’s game, leave this to the coaches since it may cause confusion and erode the Player’s confidence.

Be your child’s best fan and support him unconditionally. Don’t withdraw your love when he performs below his standard.

On transporting your son home, please be supporting and always focus on the positive aspects of his game.

Develop a responsibility in your son to pack his own kit, clean boots and bring along his water bottle full of water only.

Respect the facilities at Athenry Soccer Club and our opponents’ grounds.

Do not allow any of your young children to roam around the facilities, please also do not allow them to play on any goal posts, this could be dangerous.

Do not criticize your child’s coach to your child or other parents, if you are not happy with the coach you should raise the issue with the coach and follow the procedure laid out in the “Complaints/Grievance Procedure”

Encourage your child to speak with the coach. If your child is having difficulties in training or games, or can’t attend training etc. encourage him to speak directly to the coaches. This “responsibility taking” is a big part of becoming a mature person. By handling off the field tasks, your child is claiming ownership of all aspects of the game.

Monitor your child’s stress level at home. Keep an eye on the Player to make sure that they are handling stress effectively from the various activities of life.

Monitor eating and sleeping habits. Be sure that your child is eating the correct foods. Players should be in bed at 9.30 pm on the night before a game and early enough on other nights to ensure that adequate rest is being taken.

Help your child keep his priorities correct. He needs to maintain a focus on schoolwork, relationships, and other things in life besides football. However you and he have made a commitment to the Club so help him to honor that commitment.

Help the young Player to focus on the performance and not the result. Winning is not as important as the performance.

Support all the Players in your son’s squad. Do not criticize any other Players in the squad.

Do not criticize the opponents, their parents, coaches or the referee.

View the game from the designated areas for spectators. 

We would ask all parents to agree and adhere to Athenry Football clubs Code of Conduct and Child Protection Policy. Club officials may ask any parent who abuses the above policy to leave the clubs grounds. Parents must also note that Children who abuse the above policy may be suspended or asked to leave Athenry Football Club. Should the Player and or his parent/guardian have any grievance or complaint then they shall follow the procedures set out in the Complaints/Grievance Procedure.

Complaints/Grievance Procedure
Any abuse of the above code by a coach, player or parent must be reported to the Athenry Soccer club committee immediately and to the club Child Safety Officer where appropriate. A form may be got at reception in the club grounds at Moonbaun or from any committee member.  It must be then completed and immediately given to Athenry Soccer Club committee or club Child Safety Officer. All matters relating to the above will be dealt with the by any of the following: 

Athenry Football Club Committee

Athenry Football Club Committee and Club Child Safety Officer

Athenry Football Club Disciplinary Committee and Club Child Safety Officer 

Contact Numbers for any Incidents or Reports 

Athenry Football Club: 091-875939